the wrong jesus

After hearing good things about this book on Twitter, and finding out that the author is from the city I’ll soon be living in, I decided to check it out.

The Wrong Jesus (2014) is written by Greg Monette (PhD cand), and it explores the person of Jesus through history, archeology, and tradition.

The Wrong Jesus addresses eleven great questions, including:

  • Did Jesus Really Exist?
  • What Are Our Main Sources for Knowing About Jesus?
  • Has the Text of the New Testament Changed Over Time?
  • Did Jesus Think He Was God?
  • Did Jesus Come Back From the Dead?

One of the highlights of the book for me, is the honestly and transparency of the author. If there are certain historical or scriptural difficulties, Monette doesn’t gloss over them and doesn’t ask his readers to simply have an uninformed and uneducated faith. This level of honesty may be disarming for some readers, but I found it to be very refreshing and it displays the intellectual integrity of the author.

For those who love digging deeper into the content of a book, at the close of each chapter Monette gives a number of great reflection/discussion questions and a list of recommended books for further reading. Although lots of books add a set of reflection/discussion questions at the end of a chapter, Monette asks some great questions that go beyond simply summarizing or regurgitating the content, but leads the reader to wrestle with and apply the information just read.

I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to learn more about Jesus. This book is for the unbeliever, the skeptic, the new believer, and the long time faithful believer. Although The Wrong Jesus is a very scholarly work, Monette is an engaging author, and you will find this book to be very accessible.

For more information on the author, check out his website www.gregmonette.com

For a great talk from Monette on ‘faith and doubt’, click HERE.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Book Review: “The Wrong Jesus” by Greg Monette

  1. Thank you for this review! It’s actually convinced me to purchase the book. I had seen it recommended by a Christian friend, but I was going to pass over it on the fear that it– like so many other books with similar intentions– would simply assert its own position without dealing honestly with the positions held by others. Your post allays that fear.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s